Tag Archives: technology integration

Day 5: Strategies for Working Together

This is the fifth post in a series about launching the use of the app Book Creator in a kindergarten classroom.  You can read the first three posts by clicking on the links below.

Today’s blog post is written by guest blogger Laura Meehan.  Laura is an Instructional Digital Age Learning Coach with a specialty in math and science. You can follow her on Twitter @LauraMeehan04

 

IMG_5198.JPGNext up in the “Katie & Laura are overwhelmed by kindergarteners” series…Strategies for Working Together!

We’ve been noticing over the past four days that our kindergarten friends are so excited to work on their devices that they are forgetting the basic rules of working with a friend kindly. Sometimes it’s just instinct for a five or six-year-old to grab an iPad from their partner and hurt a heart along the way so we felt like today was the day to bring back some reminders about collaborating on our devices.

We started with an anchor chart with three strategies for working together:
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We shared each strategy and then provided some dramatic interpretation of the strategy, performed by me and Katie. While the kids were quick to point out that we weren’t actually making a book on our screen during our performance, they were also quick to pick out that we were being kind, making compromises, and sharing. Before leaving the rug, each set of partners chose a strategy for working together and then head out to their iPads to get started.

The students found so much value in their work today. Their partnerships created a system of checks and balances that provided some needed accountability in this process. They identified the features of their science books that were missing because they were focused on what they would do when it was their turn. Also, Katie stopped them for a mid workshop teaching point to share her own science book about chicks. This check-in prompted the students to push their own thinking by adding audio buttons when they couldn’t express themselves effectively enough through writing, and to vary the size and quantity of photos for different purposes. To wrap up, we had kids complete a short Google Form to reflect on their work and choose the working together strategy that was their favorite using the stick figures from our anchor chart. So far, they like “talk & type” the most.

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My super favorite part was when some little guys who struggled earlier this week with partner work found comfort in the structures provided. The “stop, think, agree” strategy gave them the right to say, “We are arguing too much and we should stop touching our iPad and talk it out.” The “talk & type” strategy gave them permission to speak up to help with spelling and creativity. The “I do, you do” strategy gave them each a chance to have their voice heard 100% without the partner squashing their thoughts.

We’re going home this weekend feeling like a million dollars. P.S. Kindergarten teachers deserve a triple salary, a personal massage therapist, and bottomless Starbucks.IMG_5184.JPG

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Days 3 & 4: Interview A Friend

 

This is the fourth post in a series about launching the use of the app Book Creator in a kindergarten classroom.  You can read the first three posts by clicking on the links below.

During planning we thought that a great way to get the kids going would be to have them interview each other.  We wanted them to have an opportunity to talk about and connect with learning that they were already doing and to share some questions they had.  This was also a way to get them into book creator before their was much action with the chicks.

Day 3

I did a simple illustrated chart to try and support their efforts.  We discussed a few guidelines for contents and agreed that each student should say three things they knew about chicks and one to two things they wondered.  Our send off directions were “Think, Practice, Record,” and we chanted it a few times together before partners went off to their working spaces.  We also discussed what it meant to be professional so that they could elevate the quality of their work.

The recording was a bit bumpy at first as it was the first time they had recorded another student.  They found themselves rerecording a lot because their initial attempt was too quiet or focused on someone’s feet.

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This is my terrible chart.  Luckily Kindergartners are very forgiving.

The most exciting part of Day 3 was that one of the eggs started to crack!  The students gathered close looking at the crack and trying to take a picture for their book.

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The first egg begins to hatch
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Students work as a team to edit a page in their book.

Day 4

Several students still needed to record by day 4 and we also wanted them to go back and look at their work to see if they had done what we had decided on.  Laura typed up this little editing checklist for teams to use as they went back and reviewed their videos.  Many students found that they had said three things they knew but forgot to share a wonder.  To avoid frustration we suggested they just make a second video on their page with their questions.  This was also a helpful strategy for students who were struggling to get the whole thing done in one sitting.

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A checklist for video revision.

By the end of day 4 most students had completed their videos, revised their covers, and were excited to see that some of the chicks had hatched!  Just in time for us to get some content for our book.

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The first hatched chicks!  Complete with decorations for the box.

We identified two areas to go next; partner work and content.  Partner skills were getting rusty at this point and we found ourselves mediating a lot of disagreements.  On the other hand we also felt like it was important that they begin to use their knowledge of nonfiction features to get some meaty content in their books.  We discussed it with the teachers and they agreed that the social stuff needed to come first.  So we were left wondering…what strategies could kindergartners use to help them work together?

Come back tomorrow for a guest post by Laura Meehan, iDal Coach and my daily work buddy.  She will be blogging about Day 5: Strategies for Working Together.

Launching Book Creator with Kindergarten: A Blog Series

In this first post of the series I break down the why, the how, and the what if of using Book Creator in a kindergarten classroom.

The thought of teaching kindergarten makes me sweaty.  Give me 32 fifth graders…no problem.  But a group of small people all needing their shoes ties or arguing over whose turn it is makes my eye twitch.  I used to let Kristin handle all things primary however, in my new role as a coach I work K-5 and it’s been a goal of mine to spend more time with our littlest learners.  Cut to an afternoon planning meeting where everyone is sitting in little chairs.

Present: myself, my co-coach for the school, two amazing kindergarten teachers, and a heap of inspiration.

Our question: What’s the best way for kids to use technology to amplify their experience with hatching live chicks?

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There is something so wonderfully Kindergarten about having live chicks in the classroom.  So when we sat down to plan we talked through what the goals of this learning experience were, what we hoped students would get out of it, and what this might look like in a kindergarten classroom.  Overall we agreed that we didn’t want to lose any of the homegrown pieces that the students had done before like making signs and designing by hand.  So we decided that creating a book about the experience where they could document both digital and hand done work would be perfect.  This would also enable them to take video, record voices, and learn to work in collaborative partnerships due to their one to two ratio with devices.  It also served as a way for kids to apply their learning from writing workshop all year and as a powerful sharing piece.

As we talked a loose plan began to form.

  • First, we would do a launching lesson where students would simply play with the app and discover what it could do.  We chose this based on work we had done with first grade and our knowledge about the power of play as a learning tool in the primary grades.
  • Next, students would learn how to create a book with a partner and practice by making a cover for their book.
  • Then students would interview each other in order to learn about the video function of book creator and to add some additional content about the book.
  • After that we would explore how they could learn to be journalists and what types of artifacts they might collect to put in their book.  In conjunction with that lesson we would begin to look at mentor texts and mentor tech so they could have a vision for what their book could look like.
  • Ultimately we would build it page by page, bit by bit, as the eggs arrived and hatched.  And somehow at the end of it all we would find a way to share what the students had learned and connect them with an audience for their work.

We also brainstormed a list of possible anchor charts we might want to create.

  • Common icons of book creator
  • How to write a book together
  • How to do an interview
  • Important content words for the life cycle of a chick
  • elements of a great digital book

We figured these would just be a start and that we would pay careful attention to what strategies would be support students as they moved along through the process.  Next step,  get in there and let those kids take charge!